Pasture Info

Collation of key information on pastures that can help with some of the technical questions you may have.

Typical range of feed values for straw, cereal hay and lucerne hay

 Type 
ME (MJ/kg M)
Digestibility (%)
CP (%)
NDF (%)
ADF (%)
 Straw
5 - 6
35 - 65
3 - 6
65 - 75
47 - 55
 Cereal Hay
8 - 11
35 - 85
8 - 14
45 - 60
30 - 45
 Lucerne Hay
9.5 - 10.5
50 - 75
16 - 24
35 - 45
25 - 35

Typical feed requirements of lot-fed beef cattle

 Type
Liveweight (kg)
Feed Intake (% liveweight)
ME (MJ/kg DM)
CP (%)
Daily Weight Gain (kg)
 Weaners
150
2.6
12.0
15.0
1.0
 Yearlings
300
2.9
11.0
11.5
1.3
 Steers
500
2.6
10.8
11.0
1.4
 Yearling Heifers
300
2.9
11.0
11.5
1.2
source: NSW DPI

Typical feed requirements of dairy cows

 Type
Liveweight (kg)
Energy required (MJ/day)
Feed intake (kgDM/day)
ME (MJ/kg DM)
CP (%)
Daily weight gain/loss (kg)
 Cow producing 35 L/day,
non-pregnant
600
231
21
11
17
-0.5
 Cow producing 20 L/day,
3 months pregnant
500
160
16
10
14
0
 Non lactating cow,
8 months pregnant  
500
117
13
9
12
0
 Growing heifer,
2 months pregnant
400
80
8
10
12
0.7
source: NSW DPI
faq-about-silage

FAQ about silage

By Frank Mickan

Every dairyfarmer making silage will be doing so under different management and climatic conditions with a range of machinery and varying levels of operator experience. This article aims to provide answers to FAQ's from farmers.

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10steps-pasture-sowing-success

Ten steps to pasture sowing success

By Frank Mickan

Failed or poor germination of newly sown autumpn pastures can cause many arguments between farmers, contractors and seed companies. So often a below expectation germination is due to one or more errors in the sowing process. The key thing to remember is that pasture seed needs good soil contact.

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underst-hay-heat

Understanding why hay heats

By Frank Mickan

Most dairyfarmers have seen or heard of hay stacks that become so hot that they have begun to smoke or even burst into flames. This leads to questions of what causes this heating, why does some hay heat more than others and what is the difference between bale types.

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when-silage-test

When should silage be tested?

By Frank Mickan

When forages have been harvested and fully sealed, they undergo many compositional changes and this is initially due to the action of plant enzymes. Other chemical and organic changes also occur due to a range of undesirable aerobic (air) micro-organisms.

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